Top D.C. real estate stories (Week of April 24)

Top D.C. real estate stories (Week of April 24)

Two former Olympians now working in D.C. commercial real estate, a banner war in Southwest, high hopes for D.C.'s spring real estate market and more in this week's top stories.

D.C. building bans balcony banners after residents use them to argue about politics | Washingtonian

The likely inspiration for this sudden order, according to one resident, was a rush of political banners in the past few months, starting with a “Trump: Make America Great Again” flag that appeared shortly after last November’s election.

D.C.'s missing middle | Urban Turf

Their income enables them to afford a monthly mortgage, although likely not a down payment, for a home.

This spring's real estate market likely to be busier than last year's | Curbed DC

Some of the factors that survey respondents said will contribute to a busier spring include an improved job market, more first-time homebuyers entering the market, more qualified buyers.

D.C. area tops the list for black, Latino homeownership rates, Trulia says | Washington Post

The D.C. area tops the list for the largest increase in black homeownership between 1990 and 2015, with a 9.6 percent rise.

7 former star athletes in D.C. commercial real estate | Bisnow

Commercial real estate is a competitive industry, and some of the top players in the DC market have backgrounds in high-level sports that set them up for high-stakes dealing.

Our favorite real estate stories (Week of April 17)

Our favorite real estate stories (Week of April 17)

Is living in D.C. worth it for Millennials? Are robots taking over the home construction business? Why should you hire a real estate attorney anyway? All this and more in this week's favorite stories.

The Robots Streamlining Home Construction | Urban Turf

Humans pick up where the robots leave off, adding details to more-customized pieces and moving and packing the products to be shipped to development sites.

Selling Your Home in a Seller’s Market Isn’t as Easy as You Think | Washington Post

Some say a home in this market will sell itself. That’s true, but only if it’s priced strategically, staged well, photographed professionally and marketed properly.

For Millennials, is living in Washington, D.C. worth it? | Curbed DC

What needs to happen for developers to keep Millennials in the District is to construct housing that will appeal to the values of those who are trying to build a family: good schools, low-cost housing, and more space.

Republican tax reform plan puts 1031 Exchanges on the chopping block | Bisnow

Investors use 1031 exchanges as a way to defer the tax from any capital gains earned through the sale of a property, so long as the money is immediately used to purchase another asset.

Buying a house? Hire a real estate attorney | Huffington Post

Attorneys are the only professionals involved in the real estate transaction who represent you and are ethically bound to act in your interest.

Headlines: The studio stigma; top DC suburbs for young workers

Here is a look at what's happening in real estate in and around the District of Columbia.

What you should know before buying a newly constructed home

Plan the details of your new home’s infrastructure and finishes, allocate your budget for the features and amenities that will make it uniquely yours, and monitor its construction with a builder who stands behind their work. -Washington Post

Title insurance: A friend in deed

After a house goes into contract, a title company searches public records, typically going back a number of years, to look for any problems with the home’s title. More than a third of all title searches reveal a problem, according to the American Land Title Association (ALTA). -Wall Street Journal

The studio stigma

Those who live in studios are staying in them longer and learning to make their peace with it and those newly entering the market, regardless of their age and status, are becoming more open to the idea of living in a studio. -New York Observer

10 best DC suburbs for young professionals

So, you're in your 20s and have a great job. The next question is: Where do you want to live? If big-city life isn't for you, there are plenty of suburban offerings surrounding the District. -Washington Business Journal

The essential guide to being an amateur landord in DC

We recommend consulting directly with DC’s Department of Consumer and Regulatory Affairs (DCRA) if you’re confused or unsure whether your unit needs a particular certification. -Urban Turf

Headlines: 11th Street Bridge project to launch major capital campaign

Here is a look at what's happening in real estate in and around the District of Columbia.

Expect to see more transit-oriented housing in the future

Transit-oriented development is driven in part by real estate market forces and changing demographics. Studies show  that single-person households are now the most common household type, and that young adults as well as seniors prefer living in pedestrian-oriented, urban-style communities served by transit. -Washington Post

DC files suit against Virginia couple over shoddy home renovations

The attorney general's office launched an investigation late last year, shortly after Hofgard signed an agreement with the D.C. Department of Consumer and Regulatory Affairs not to sell any more properties that had code violations. -WAMU

DC park aims to beat gentrification where others have failed

The project, which is getting half of its construction money from D.C. and will launch a major capital campaign this year, spans two areas with very different economic realities: the tonier Ward 6 neighborhoods of Capitol Hill and the Navy Yard neighborhoods to the northwest and the Ward 8 neighborhoods of Anacostia and Fairlawn to the southeast. -Next City

Here's where the largest Whole Foods Market in the region is going

The first phase of The Boro, a massive project that has not yet earned Fairfax County’s approval, is expected to deliver in 2018. It will feature the largest Whole Foods in the D.C. area, and one of the largest in the Mid-Atlantic, a Whole Foods spokeswoman confirmed. -Washington Business Journal

Half of DC couples filing income taxes separately had large income disparities

Couples who together earned between $100,000 and $350,000 a year had a less striking income differential, though the blog District Measured notes that 40 percent of people in that bracket still showed an income differential of 50 percent or more. -Urban Turf

Headlines: On the brink of a housing boom in NoMa; 67 condos coming to Logan Circle

Here's a look at what's happening in real estate in and around the District of Columbia. 

The Union Market housing boom is about to explode

In May, the neighborhood’s first mixed residential/retail space will break ground. If all goes well, eight more development projects will follow. -Washingtonian

Massive Tyson's project rebranded, final development plans filed

One of the few massive Tysons overhauls remaining in the Fairfax County pipeline has a new name and a clear vision for the initial phases of development. -Washington Business Journal

67-unit condo project on site of Logan Circle car wash will deliver in 2016

The development will consist of studios, one-bedrooms and two-bedrooms. There will be five inclusionary zoning units, as well as 27 parking spaces and 26 bicycle spots. -Urban Turf

Concerns rising over new affordable housing law

The Disposition of District Land for Affordable Housing Amendment Act (DDLAH) requires residential buildings built on land formally owned by the District to allocate 30 percent of their units to affordable housing. -Curbed DC

Wary homeowners offered new ways to finance their next move

Now, rising home values are drawing homeowners back into the market, but many remain hesitant. They worry about not being able to find another home in their price range — especially if buying a new one is contingent on selling the one they have.-Washington Post

Racing to buy homes sight unseen

With the low-hanging fruit from the housing bust mostly picked, Wall Street-backed buyers of real estate are increasingly turning to quantitative data analysis as a way of accelerating their search for a dwindling supply of available homes that can be transformed into rental properties. -Wall Street Journal

  • Ways to save at closing

    Title charges are the largest chunk of closing costs and can vary by hundreds of dollars.

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  • What are closing costs?

    The real estate closing process involves loan steps, legal steps and title steps.

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  • What's title insurance?

    Insure your legal ownership just like you'd insure the building, but for lots cheaper.

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