Maryland First-time Homebuyers: True/False

If you're a first-time homebuyer in Maryland, you may have heard conflicting information about tax credits and other incentives offered in Maryland, so we've dispelled a few common myths.

As long as you have not owned a principal residence in Maryland in three years, you qualify as a Maryland first-time homebuyer.

FALSE: The code does not provide a reset clause – if you have ever previously owned a principal residence in Maryland, no matter when, you are not eligible for the exemption.

If you have previously owned a property in Maryland, but have never lived in that property, you qualify for the exemption.

TRUE: The requirement is that you must not have previously owned a principal residence in Maryland. Previously owning a non-principal residence does not disqualify you, as long as the property that you are purchasing will be your principal residence.

It does not matter how you title the property, you will receive the exemption as long as you are a Maryland first-time homebuyer.

FALSE: If the purchaser is a Trust, a Partnership, an LLC, or a Corporation, it can not qualify as a Maryland first-time homebuyer.

If two people are buying a principal residence, as long as one of the buyers has never previously owned a principal residence in Maryland, they can receive the exemption. 

FALSE: Every purchaser who intends to live at the property as a principal residence must have never previously owned a principal residence in Maryland.

While I qualify for the exemption, my parents who will be on title only to help me get the loan disqualify me since they already own a principal residence in Maryland.

FALSE: The Maryland Code will still allow the exemption as long as the parents sign an affidavit stating that they are a co-maker or guarantor of a purchase money deed of trust and that they will not occupy the residence as their principal residence.

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