Buying new construction? Agents, homebuyers should verify proper permitting

Too often, after closing a homebuyer is faced with faulty workmanship performed by a contractor and/or the seller. In some cases, the homebuyer finds out too late that the faulty workmanship was not even permitted.

This scenario can lead to blood-bath of expenses, including the possibility that a government inspector orders a demolition of the work for health and safety reasons.

Under the terms of the GCAAR sales contract, a seller of new construction or a newly renovated house is not contractually obligated to produce permits for the benefit of the homebuyer. Therefore, it is advisable that an agent and/or the homebuyer verify proper permitting by the seller.

The good news is that it’s easy to research. Most jurisdictions maintain on online database for permits and accompanying inspections. Below, I have listed just a few of the links for researching permits in the surrounding jurisdictions.

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