Avoid the DC recapture tax 'surprise'

If you are an agent listing a property for a decedent’s estate/personal representative in DC, help your client and the prospective purchaser avoid a potential big surprise – the real property recapture tax.

DC Office of Tax and Revenue has recently been imposing a recapture tax against properties that were receiving senior citizen tax relief but ineligible due to the property owner’s death – i.e., a change in eligibility.

That is, upon the death of the owner, the personal representative for the estate would be responsible for notifying DC, within 30 days, that the property is no longer eligible for the benefit.

Since it’s unlikely the personal representative is aware of this requirement, the property continues to unjustly receive the benefit until such time as the property is sold.

Once the property is conveyed, DCOTR is notified by DCROD of the change in status and retroactively applies the proper tax status from the date of death through the date of conveyance. This often results in a hefty recapture tax amount then applied against the real property tax account.

As the settlement company, we are being proactive in our efforts to notify DC prior to closing and obtain the recapture tax amount such that it can be handled prior to or at the time of closing.

In some cases, due to timing, this is not possible and the purchasers are left with a recapture tax incurred by the decedent’s estate.

We advise all agents listing a property for a decedent’s estate to be aware of this issue, check the tax status to determine whether it is unjustly receiving the senior citizen tax relief benefit, and make the personal representative aware of the requirement to notify DC of the status change and be prepared to pay a recapture tax.

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